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Keynote Lectures

Cyber Security When IT Meets OT
Sokratis K. Katsikas, Department of Information Security and Communication Technology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Gjøvik, Norway

Don’t Tell Me The Cybersecurity Moon Is Shining… (Cybersecurity Show and Tell)
Luca Vigano, King's College London, United Kingdom

 

Cyber Security When IT Meets OT

Sokratis K. Katsikas
Department of Information Security and Communication Technology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Gjøvik
Norway
https://www.ntnu.edu/employees/sokratis.katsikas
 

Brief Bio

Sokratis K. Katsikas was born in Athens, Greece, in 1960. He is the Director of the Norwegian Centre for Cybersecurity in Critical Sectors and Professor with the Department of Information Security and Communication Technology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway. He is also Professor Emeritus of the Department of Digital Systems, University of Piraeus, Greece. In 2019 we was awarded a Doctorate Honoris Causa from the Department of Production and Management Engineering, Democritus University of Thrace, Greece. In 2021 he was ranked 7th in the security professionals category of the IFSEC Global influencers in security and fire list.  Among others, he has been the Rector of the Open University of Cyprus; Rector and Vice Rector of the University of the Aegean, Greece; General Secretary of Telecommunications and Posts of the Hellenic Government; Chair of the National Council of Education of Greece; member of the Board of the Hellenic Authority for the Security and Privacy of Communications; chair of the Steering Committee of the EUA Institutional Evaluation Programme; and member of the Board of the Hellenic Authority for the Quality and Accreditation of Higher Education. He chairs the Steering Committee of the ESORICS Conference and he is the Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Information Security.


Abstract
The current trend of automation and data exchange in industry, through the development, use and integration of cyber-physical systems, the Internet of things, cloud computing, artificial intelligence and other enabling technologies is expected to bring tremendous benefits in the economy, including improved productivity and efficiency, better flexibility and agility, and increased profitability. However, it also comes with increased cybersecurity risks, primarily deriving from the integration of information technology and operational technology. Thus, as in all cases of a major shift in computing paradigms, a number of cybersecurity challenges arise, that cannot be addressed by simply porting solutions from other domains. In this talk a brief overview of such challenges, and current best practices for addressing them, as well as open issues will be provided.



 

 

Don’t Tell Me The Cybersecurity Moon Is Shining… (Cybersecurity Show and Tell)

Luca Vigano
King's College London
United Kingdom
www.lucavigano.com
 

Brief Bio
Luca Viganò is Professor at the Department of Informatics of King's College London, UK, where he heads the Cybersecurity Group. His research focuses on formal methods and tools for the specification, verification and testing of cybersecurity and privacy. He is particularly interested in formal analysis of socio-technical systems, whose security depends intrinsically on human users, and of cyber-physical systems, where one needs to explicitly consider the underlying physical processes. He also works on explainable cybersecurity, where, in addition to more formal approaches, he has been investigating how different kinds of artworks can be used to explain cybersecurity and how telling (i.e., explaining notions in a formal, technical way) can be paired with showing through visual storytelling or other forms of storytelling. He is Global Envoy for King’s College London and Vice Dean (Enterprise & Engagement) of the Faculty of Natural, Mathematical & Engineering Sciences.


Abstract
"Show, don’t tell” has become the literary commandment for any writer. It applies to all forms of fiction, and to non-fiction, including scientific writing, where it lies at the heart of many scientific communication and storytelling approaches. In this talk, I will discuss how “show and tell” is actually often the best approach when one wants to present, teach or explain complicated ideas such as those underlying notions and results in mathematics and science, and in particular in cybersecurity. I will discuss how different kinds of artworks can be used to explain cybersecurity and I illustrate how telling (i.e., explaining notions in a formal, technical way) can be paired with showing through visual storytelling or other forms of storytelling. I will also discuss four categories of artworks and the explanations they help provide. This talk covers research that I have described in my papers "Explaining Cybersecurity Using Films and the Arts”, "Don’t Tell Me The Cybersecurity Moon Is Shining… (Cybersecurity Show and Tell)” and "Nicolas Cage is the Center of the Cybersecurity Universe”. I will also present some results that are still unpublished about experiments that we have carried out to understand the quantitative and qualitative impact of films and other popular artworks. Finally, I will also discuss some of my works on formal methods to deal with security assurance as a true socio-technical problem rather than a mere technical one, and to reason about cyber systems as socio-technical systems with people at their hearts.



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